Sewage Pollution Right to Know Law 101

Save the Sound is urging the public and the press to access reports in CT and/or sign up to receive alerts in NY and share them in your community. The Sewage Pollution Right to Know Law (SPRTK) went into effect in May 2013 making information about sewage overflows publicly available. Since that time thousands of […]

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Governor Cuomo Shares Vision & Investment Plan for Clean Water & Healthy Sound

Increased clean water and environmental funding for New York State means a safer and more vibrant Long Island Sound.

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Sewage pollution in Westchester demands legal action

We hoped it wouldn’t come to this. But Long Island Sound can’t wait any longer.

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99 sewage spills. Where do they come from?

There have been 99 documented sewage spills in Westchester since 2010…and still counting.

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Our Water Quality Monitoring Results for July

Our staff and volunteers have tested 51 sites in Westchester County and Greenwich for water-borne bacteria. Here’s what they found.

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Save the Sound starts summer water quality monitoring and beach alerts

Efforts will increase knowledge about water pollution in Westchester, Nassau, and Greenwich

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Westchester County: Stop the Sewage Overflows that Pollute the Sound

For over a decade, state, county, and municipal officials have failed to effectively address sewage overflows and leaking sewer pipes in Westchester County.

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Open Beaches Belie Chronic Pollution Problems

Beaches in Westchester & Nassau counties were closed preemptively far fewer times in 2014 than in 2013. But don’t be fooled. The improvement is not a sign that the water is getting cleaner. In fact, it’s not a lasting improvement at all.

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Wednesday, May 20, 12:00 p.m.
"Why humans are so bad at thinking about climate change" Environmental Film Discussion Join us for an interactive panel discussion as we talk about “Why humans are so bad at thinking about climate change,” a 10-minute film that discusses the psychology behind climate change and why people are often hesitant to think about it.

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